Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Quantitative measurement of monocyte HLA-DR expression in the identification of early-onset neonatal infection.

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utilities of monocyte HLA-DR as an infection marker in the identification of early-onset clinical infection and pneumonia in newborn infants.

METHODS: Term newborns in whom infection was suspected when they were <72 h of age were eligible for enrollment in the study. C-reactive protein (CRP), monocyte HLA-DR and neutrophil CD64 expressions were quantitatively measured at the time of sepsis evaluation (0 h) and 24 h afterwards by flow cytometry and standard laboratory method.

RESULTS: A total of 288 infants with suspected sepsis were investigated, and 93 were found to be clinically infected. There were no significant differences in monocyte HLA-DR expression between the infected, non-infected and control groups at 0 h (median (interquartile range): 13,986 (10,994-18,544), 14,234 (12,045-17,474) and 18,441 (14,250-21,537) antibody phycoerythrin (PE) molecules bound/cell), and between infected and non-infected infants at 24 h (median (interquartile range): 17,772 (12,933-25,167) and 19,406 (14,885-24,225) antibody PE molecules bound/cell). The areas under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for HLA-DR, CD64 and CRP were 0.52-0.54, 0.88-0.94 and 0.75-0.77, respectively. We were unable to determine an optimal cutoff value for HLA-DR, as the diagnostic utilities of any cutoff point on the ROC curves were unable to satisfy the criteria (i.e. sensitivity and specificity >or=80%) for consideration as an useful diagnostic marker of infection.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings did not support the use of monocyte HLA-DR alone or in combination with other infection markers in the diagnosis of early-onset clinical infection and pneumonia in term newborns.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app