COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

[Long stapled haemorrhoidectomy versus Milligan-Morgan procedure: short- and long-term results of a randomised, controlled, prospective trial]

Simona Ascanelli, Claudio Gregorio, Giulia Tonini, Marco Baccarini, Gianfranco Azzena
Chirurgia Italiana 2005, 57 (4): 439-47
16060181
The aim of this study was to assess the short- and long-term results of treatment for haemorrhoids by prospectively comparing two techniques, namely, stapled rectal prolapse mucosectomy according to Longo and open hemorrhoidectomy. One hundred consecutive patients were randomised to stapled (50 patients) or manual hemorrhoidectomy (50 patients). We analysed postoperative pain, preoperative and postoperative anorectal function, intraoperative and postoperative complications, time needed to return to work and to normal social activities, and costs. Long-term follow data were obtained by means of an outpatient visit. The operative time of the stapled technique was less than that of open haemorrhoidectomy (22 vs 35 minutes). Two cases of early postoperative bleeding occurred after the stapled technique. The mean pain score on a visual scale was significantly less in patients undergoing the stapled technique. In addition, the time needed to return to work and to normal social activities was significantly less after the stapled technique, which, however, proved to be a more expensive procedure. Stapled mucosectomy of the prolapsed rectal mucosa is a safe, rapid, and relatively painless technique, which has a low incidence of complications. It can be performed in a day surgery unit. Patient satisfaction, early return to normal activities and good long-term results counterbalance the high cost of the procedure.

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