JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effects of seizures on brain development: lessons from the laboratory.

Both clinical and laboratory studies demonstrate that seizures early in life can result in permanent behavioral abnormalities and enhance epileptogenicity. In experimental rodent models, the consequences of seizures are dependent upon age, etiology, seizure duration, and frequency. Recurrent seizures in immature rats result in long-term adverse effects on learning and memory. These behavioral changes are paralleled by changes in brain connectivity, dendritic morphology, excitatory and inhibitory receptor subunits, ion channels, and neurogenesis. These changes can occur in the absence of cell loss. Although impaired cognitive function and brain changes have been well documented after early onset seizures, the mechanisms of seizure-induced injury remain unclear. Recent studies have demonstrated abnormalities in single cell function that parallel behavioral changes.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app