JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil in the treatment of chronic graft-versus-host disease.

Current treatment of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) with prednisone (PSE) alone or with added cyclosporine or tacrolimus still has a very high failure and complication rate, and new treatment approaches are needed for both primary and salvage therapy. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosuppressive agent currently in use for acute graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. To determine whether MMF had activity in the treatment of cGVHD, we added MMF to standard cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and/or PSE as salvage/second-line (n = 24) or first-line (n = 10) therapy in 34 patients. Nine (90%) of 10 patients receiving first-line and 18 (75%) of 24 receiving second-line MMF therapy responded. Twelve (35%) patients had a complete remission, 15 (44%) had a partial remission, 5 (15%) had stable disease, and only 2 (6%) had progressive disease. Out of 30 patients receiving PSE, 22 (73%) were able to decrease PSE doses (median decrease of 50%; range, 25%-100%). With a median follow-up of 24 months (range, 6-28 months), 29 (85%) patients are alive. Three patients had to discontinue MMF because of abdominal cramps within 3 months of starting treatment. These data suggest that MMF is an active, well-tolerated agent in the treatment of cGVHD and may have a beneficial effect on the survival of patients with this complication.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app