Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
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Tribendimidine: a promising, safe and broad-spectrum anthelmintic agent from China.

Acta Tropica 2005 April
We review, for the first time, a 20-year Chinese story of research and development pertaining to tribendimidine, a promising anthelmintic agent that is safe and exhibits a broad spectrum of activity. Tribendimidine was first synthesized at the National Institute of Parasitic Diseases in Shanghai in the mid 1980s. In laboratory studies, tribendimidine showed high efficacy against Nippostrongylus braziliensis in rats, Necator americanus in hamsters, Ancylostoma caninum and Toxocara canis in dogs, and Syphacia mesocriceti in mice. Activity was also found against several species of cestodes in chicken. In clinical trials, a single oral dose of 400 mg tribendimidine, administered to patients infected only with N. americanus, or with N. americanus and Ancylostoma duodenalis, resulted in cure rates of 85.7% (132/154) and 89.8% (53/59), respectively. In comparison, a single oral dose of 400 mg albendazole resulted in significantly lower cure rates, namely 65.5% (91/139; chi(2) = 16.47, P < 0.001) and 71.7% (43/60; chi(2) = 6.29, P = 0.012), respectively. Single oral doses of tribendimidine (300 mg) and albendazole (400mg) were equally effective against Ascaris lumbricoides infections; cure rates were 96.0% (97/101) and 98.1% (101/103), respectively. In 5-14-year-old children with an Enterobius vermicularis infection, treated with a single oral dose of 200 mg tribendimidine, a cure rate of 81.6% (93/114) was observed. Tribendimidine was well-tolerated as only mild and transient side effects were observed. It would be of great public health significance if these findings are confirmed in other epidemiological settings, as more than one-quarter of the world population is currently affected by intestinal nematodes, with only very few drugs currently available on the market.

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