RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Selective head cooling with mild systemic hypothermia after neonatal encephalopathy: multicentre randomised trial.

Lancet 2005 Februrary 20
BACKGROUND: Cerebral hypothermia can improve outcome of experimental perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia. We did a multicentre randomised controlled trial to find out if delayed head cooling can improve neurodevelopmental outcome in babies with neonatal encephalopathy.

METHODS: 234 term infants with moderate to severe neonatal encephalopathy and abnormal amplitude integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) were randomly assigned to either head cooling for 72 h, within 6 h of birth, with rectal temperature maintained at 34-35 degrees C (n=116), or conventional care (n=118). Primary outcome was death or severe disability at 18 months. Analysis was by intention to treat. We examined in two predefined subgroup analyses the effect of hypothermia in babies with the most severe aEEG changes before randomisation--ie, severe loss of background amplitude, and seizures--and those with less severe changes.

FINDINGS: In 16 babies, follow-up data were not available. Thus in 218 infants (93%), 73/110 (66%) allocated conventional care and 59/108 (55%) assigned head cooling died or had severe disability at 18 months (odds ratio 0.61; 95% CI 0.34-1.09, p=0.1). After adjustment for the severity of aEEG changes with a logistic regression model, the odds ratio for hypothermia treatment was 0.57 (0.32-1.01, p=0.05). No difference was noted in the frequency of clinically important complications. Predefined subgroup analysis suggested that head cooling had no effect in infants with the most severe aEEG changes (n=46, 1.8; 0.49-6.4, p=0.51), but was beneficial in infants with less severe aEEG changes (n=172, 0.42; 0.22-0.80, p=0.009).

INTERPRETATION: These data suggest that although induced head cooling is not protective in a mixed population of infants with neonatal encephalopathy, it could safely improve survival without severe neurodevelopmental disability in infants with less severe aEEG changes.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app