Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Surgical implications of transesophageal echocardiography to grade the atheromatous aortic arch.

Stroke is an especially serious complication of cardiopulmonary bypass with an incidence of 2% to 5%. This prospective study used transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in 97 patients more than 65 years of age (mean age, 73 years) to identify those at high risk for aortic atheroemboli. The atheromatous disease of the aorta was graded by TEE: grade I = minimal intimal thickening (n = 29); II = extensive intimal thickening (n = 33); III = sessile atheroma (n = 15); IV = protruding atheroma (n = 10); V = mobile atheroma (n = 10). Clinical evaluation was also performed by intraoperative aortic palpation. Four patients who were graded as having normal aortas by palpation had intraoperative strokes. In contrast, 3 of these 4 patients were in grade V on TEE. The relationship of TEE to incidence of stroke was statistically significant (p less than 0.006), whereas there was no significant correlation between clinical grade and stroke incidence. Four of 10 TEE grade V patients were treated with hypothermic circulatory arrest and aortic arch debridement, and none suffered strokes. The other 6 patients were treated with standard techniques, and 3 had strokes. These results suggest that patients with mobile atheromatous disease are at high risk for embolic strokes that are not predicted by routine clinical evaluation. Selective use of circulatory arrest in the presence of TEE-detected mobile arch atheromas may reduce the risk of intraoperative stroke.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app