JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Recombinant DNA-derived leishmania proteins: from the laboratory to the field.

Leishmaniases, caused by parasites belonging to Leishmania spp, constitute a vast variety of diseases, from cutaneous lesions (CL) to visceral leishmaniasis (VL). If untreated, leishmaniases can be fatal, and affect 12 million people in nearly 90 countries, presenting a worldwide public-health problem. Most diagnostic tools are not suitable for use in field conditions. There is no satisfactory chemotherapy for CL; chemotherapy for VL is efficient in most immunocompetent people, but not in immunocompromised individuals, and is toxic and costly; and chemotherapy-resistant leishmania strains have also been reported. At present, there is no vaccine against leishmaniases: vaccine development for parasitic diseases is more difficult than for most bacteria and viruses due to the complexity of the pathogen and its intricate interactions with the vertebrate host. We review the recombinant DNA-derived leishmania proteins of potential use in diagnostics, therapy, and development of vaccines, and address the question of how these proteins can aid in the fight against leishmaniases.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app