CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

A prospective multicenter study to evaluate the feasibility and safety of aggressive antihypertensive treatment in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

The authors performed a multicenter prospective observational study to evaluate the feasibility and safety of intravenous antihypertensive protocol for acute hypertension in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Twenty-seven patients with ICH and acute hypertension (mean age 61.37 +/- 14.27; 10 were men) were treated to maintain the systolic blood pressure (BP) below 160 mm Hg and diastolic BP below 90 mm Hg within 24 hours of symptom onset. Neurological deterioration (defined as a decrease in initial Glasgow Coma Scale score > or = 2) was observed in 2 (7.4%) of 27 patients during treatment. Among patients who underwent follow-up computed tomography, hematoma expansion (more than 33% increase in hematoma size at 24 hours) was observed in 2 (9.1%) of 22 patients. Patients treated within 6 hours of symptom onset were more likely to be functionally independent (modified Rankin scale < or = 2) at 1 month compared with patients who were treated between 6 and 24 hours (8 of 18 versus 0 of 9,P = .03). Aggressive pharmacological treatment of acute hypertension in patients with ICH can be initiated early with a low rate of neurological deterioration and hematoma expansion.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app