CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Haemophilus influenzae lymphadenopathy in a patient with agammaglobulinemia: clinical-histologic-microbiologic correlation and review of the literature.

Agammaglobulinemia is the most common primary immunodeficiency, with an incidence of approximately 1 in 250,000 males in the United States. These patients are at risk for frequent recurrent infections, which may become fatal if untreated. Patients have increased susceptibility to encapsulated pyogenic bacteria. Haemophilus influenzae is second only to Streptococcus pneumoniae as the bacteria most frequently implicated in infections in these patients. We present a case involving an adolescent boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and H influenzae cervical adenopathy, confirmed twice by culture. We correlate the clinical, microbiologic, and histologic findings. Owing to the severity of infections in this population, surgical intervention is more common than in the immunocompetent population. This description may help the pathologist in considering a differential diagnosis when examining a diagnostic lymph node biopsy in these patients.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app