COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Use of a constrained tripolar acetabular liner to treat intraoperative instability and postoperative dislocation after total hip arthroplasty: a review of our experience

John J Callaghan, Michael R O'Rourke, Devon D Goetz, David G Lewallen, Richard C Johnston, William N Capello
Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research 2004, (429): 117-23
15577475
Constrained acetabular components have been used to treat certain cases of intraoperative instability and postoperative dislocation after total hip arthroplasty. We report our experience with a tripolar constrained component used in these situations since 1988. The outcomes of the cases where this component was used were analyzed for component failure, component loosening, and osteolysis. At average 10-year followup, for cases treated for intraoperative instability (2 cases) or postoperative dislocation (4 cases), the component failure rate was 6% (6 of 101 hips in 5 patients). For cases where the constrained liner was cemented into a fixed cementless acetabular shell, the failure rate was 7% (2 of 31 hips in 2 patients) at 3.9-year average followup. Use of a constrained liner was not associated with an increased osteolysis or aseptic loosening rate. This tripolar constrained acetabular liner provided total hip arthroplasty construct stability in most cases in which it was used for intraoperative instability or postoperative dislocation.

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