Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty in the management of cyanotic congenital heart defects.

Twenty-three children with cyanotic congenital heart defects, aged 3 days to 11.5 years, weighing 2.9 to 30 kg, underwent percutaneous balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty to improve pulmonary oligemia. The patients were divided into two groups: group I with intact ventricular septum and group II with ventricular septal defect. In 12 group I patients, there was an increase of systemic arterial oxygen saturation [83 +/- 8% (mean +/- SD) vs. 94 +/- 5%, P less than 0.001] and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio (0.7 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.0 +/- 0.2, P less than 0.001). Peak systolic pressure gradient across the pulmonary valve decreased (P less than 0.001) from 105 +/- 48 to 25 +/- 18 mm Hg. In 11 group II patients, arterial oxygen saturation (67 +/- 13 vs. 83 +/- 13%, P less than 0.01) and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio (0.7 +/- 0.4 vs. 1.2 +/- 0.5, P less than 0.02) increased following valvuloplasty. Peak systolic pressure gradient across the pulmonic valve (52 +/- 16 vs. 32 +/- 22 mm Hg, P less than 0.05) decreased while infundibular and total pulmonary outflow tract gradients were unchanged (P greater than 0.1). Immediate surgical intervention was avoided in all cases in both groups. On follow-up, 1 to 36 months after valvuloplasty, arterial oxygen saturation, pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio, and pulmonary valve gradients remain improved in both groups. However, in group I, repeat balloon valvuloplasty was required in two children. In group II, six children with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) underwent successful total surgical correction 4 months to 2 years after valvuloplasty.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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