Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

A founder effect in three large Newfoundland families with a novel clinically variable spastic ataxia and supranuclear gaze palsy.

A distinctive slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder, which falls under a new category of neurological diseases, the hereditary spastic ataxias (HSA), is described in three independently ascertained Newfoundland kindreds. HSA is a heterogeneous group of disorders in which pyramidal tract features overlap cerebellar characteristics. The families are assumed to have the same condition as, although apparently unrelated, all originate in a historically isolated cluster of rural communities and link to the same locus at 12p13, SAX1. Clinically the phenotype is very variable but lower limb hypertonicity and hyperreflexia are early and prominent generally preceded by eye movement abnormality, an impaired vertical downward saccade and a typical involuntary head jerk. These are followed by variable levels of ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Onset occurs in the first two decades and can be detected in most by early adulthood. Significant mobility problems are present by the fourth decade with a broad based ataxic and spastic gait. MRI scans of brain and spinal cord were normal. Neuropathology showed degeneration of corticospinal tracts and posterior columns and midbrain neuronal loss. The phenotype is striking in its diversity among and within families and the variability of expression can be observed within the same sibship. Pedigree analysis shows no evidence of anticipation or any sex differences in severity. The condition is unusually prevalent in the province of Newfoundland, which is characteristic of a founder effect followed by isolation and large family size. Fine mapping efforts have reduced the critical interval of the SAX1 locus to 1.9Mb. Identification of the SAX1 gene will help to clarify the pathogenesis of this type of HSA.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app