Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Prognostic indications for Hürthle cell cancer.

Hürthle cell carcinoma (HCC) has been reported to have variable clinical behavior. The objective of this study was to determine the important prognostic factors in patients with HCC. It was a retrospective investigation of 33 patients with HCC treated in our institution from 1976 to 2002. The average age of our 33 patients with HCC was 55.2 years (range 20-82 years; 23 women, 10 men). Fifteen patients (45.5%) presented with a T2 tumor, 7 (21.2%) with a T3 tumor, and 8 (24.2%) with a T4 tumor; the tumor stage was unknown in three patients. Coexisting papillary carcinoma occurred in six patients (18%), 9% of whom presented with metastatic disease. Twelve patients (36.4%) had metastases, four of whom (12.2%) had persistent HCC, and 8 (24.2%) developed recurrent HCC (range 1-9 years). Eight of these twelve patients (66.7%) died from the HCC. The average follow-up time was 5.5 years (range 1-16 years). Altogether, 3 of 23 women and 5 of 10 men died from their HCC ( p < 0.05). Of the 22 patients with T2-T3 tumors, 5 (22.7%) developed metastases and 1 patient died; 5 of 8 patients (62.5%) with T4 tumors developed metastases and died ( p < 0.01). Patients who were treated by less than total thyroidectomy had a worse prognosis by univariate analysis ( p < 0.01) but not by multivariate analysis. Survival time for patients with persistent disease was shorter than for those with recurrent disease ( p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis, however, revealed no difference for extent of operation or those with persistent and recurrent disease. The cause-specific survivals were 74% and 49% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Disease-free survivals were 65.0% and 40.5% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Our findings show that gender and stage of disease influence the prognosis of patients with HCC.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app