Case Reports
Journal Article
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Mojave rattlesnake envenomation: prolonged neurotoxicity and rhabdomyolysis.

An 11-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with hypoventilation and shock after being bitten by a Mojave rattlesnake. Intubation was required, and she improved rapidly after fluid resuscitation and antivenom administration. She was extubated four hours after envenomation and did well. The patient subsequently developed increased weakness and cranial nerve paresis and required reintubation for respiratory failure at 30 hours after envenomation despite administration of 30 vials of antivenom. She improved after administration of additional antivenom and was extubated ten hours later. Twenty-four hours after envenomation, signs of rhabdomyolysis were noted with myoglobinuria and a creatine phosphokinase level of 96,400 units/L. Myoglobinuric renal failure was treated with mannitol, hydration, and alkalinization of the urine. The patient's renal and neurological functions improved steadily during the following three to four days. Neurotoxic and myotoxic effects of Mojave venom are known to occur but are not well documented in human beings. Recognition of potential complications from envenomation such as respiratory paralysis and rhabdomyolysis with myoglobinuric renal failure is critical.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app