COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Differential roles for neuropeptide Y Y1 and Y5 receptors in anxiety and sedation

Gunnar Sørensen, Camilla Lindberg, Gitta Wörtwein, Tom G Bolwig, David P D Woldbye
Journal of Neuroscience Research 2004 September 1, 77 (5): 723-9
15352219
Central administration of neuropeptide Y (NPY) causes both anxiolysis and sedation. Previous studies suggest that both effects are mediated via NPY Y1 receptors. However, most of these studies were carried out before the advent of specific NPY receptor ligands. Therefore, a potential role for other NPY receptors in anxiety and sedation remains a possibility. In the present study, we addressed this issue by testing the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPY as well as specific receptor agonists for the Y1 receptor ([D-His(26)]NPY), Y2 receptor (C2-NPY), and Y5 receptor ([cPP(1-7),NPY(19-23),Ala(31),Aib(32),Gln(34)]hPP) in the elevated plus maze and open field tests. As with NPY, the Y1 agonist had a dose-dependent anxiolytic-like effect in both behavioral tests. In contrast to NPY, which caused significant sedation in the open field test, the Y1 agonist was without sedative effect. The Y2 agonist showed neither anxiolytic-like nor sedative effects. The Y5 agonist showed anxiolytic-like activity in both behavioral tests and caused sedation in the same dose range as NPY in the open field test. These results indicate that anxiolytic-like effects of i.c.v.-administered NPY in rats are mediated via both Y1 and Y5 receptors, whereas sedation is mediated via Y5 receptors.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
15352219
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"