COMMENT
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW

Rosacea: I. Etiology, pathogenesis, and subtype classification

Glen H Crawford, Michelle T Pelle, William D James
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 2004, 51 (3): 327-41; quiz 342-4
15337973
Rosacea is one of the most common conditions dermatologists treat. Rosacea is most often characterized by transient or persistent central facial erythema, visible blood vessels, and often papules and pustules. Based on patterns of physical findings, rosacea can be classified into 4 broad subtypes: erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular. The cause of rosacea remains somewhat of a mystery. Several hypotheses have been documented in the literature and include potential roles for vascular abnormalities, dermal matrix degeneration, environmental factors, and microorganisms such as Demodex folliculorum and Helicobacter pylori. This article reviews the current literature on rosacea with emphasis placed on the new classification system and the main pathogenic theories. Learning objective At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants should be acquainted with rosacea's defining characteristics, the new subtype classification system, and the main theories on pathogenesis.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
15337973
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"