Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
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Treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis with subcutaneous insulin aspart.

Diabetes Care 2004 August
OBJECTIVE: In this prospective, randomized, open trial, we compared the efficacy and safety of aspart insulin given subcutaneously at different time intervals to a standard low-dose intravenous (IV) infusion protocol of regular insulin in patients with uncomplicated diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 45 consecutive patients admitted with DKA were randomly assigned to receive subcutaneous (SC) aspart insulin every hour (SC-1h, n = 15) or every 2 h (SC-2h, n = 15) or to receive IV infusion of regular insulin (n = 15). Response to medical therapy was evaluated by assessing the duration of treatment until resolution of hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis. Additional end points included total length of hospitalization, amount of insulin administration until resolution of hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis, and number of hypoglycemic events.

RESULTS: Admission biochemical parameters in patients treated with SC-1h (glucose: 44 +/- 21 mmol/l [means +/- SD], bicarbonate: 7.1 +/- 3 mmol/l, pH: 7.14 +/- 0.09) were similar to those treated with SC-2h (glucose: 42 +/- 21 mmol/l, bicarbonate: 7.6 +/- 4 mmol/l, pH: 7.15 +/- 0.12) and IV regular insulin (glucose: 40 +/- 13 mmol/l, bicarbonate 7.1 +/- 4 mmol/l, pH: 7.11 +/- 0.17). There were no statistical differences in the mean duration of treatment until correction of hyperglycemia (6.9 +/- 4, 6.1 +/- 4, and 7.1 +/- 5 h) or until resolution of ketoacidosis (10 +/- 3, 10.7 +/- 3, and 11 +/- 3 h) among patients treated with SC-1h and SC-2h or with IV insulin, respectively (NS). There was no mortality and no differences in the length of hospital stay, total amount of insulin administration until resolution of hyperglycemia or ketoacidosis, or the number of hypoglycemic events among treatment groups.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the use of subcutaneous insulin aspart every 1 or 2 h represents a safe and effective alternative to the use of intravenous regular insulin in the management of patients with uncomplicated DKA.

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