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Drug treatment of intermittent claudication.

Drugs 2004
The US FDA has approved two drugs for the management of intermittent claudication: pentoxifylline and cilostazol. The mechanism of action that provides symptom relief with pentoxifylline is poorly understood but is thought to involve red blood cell deformability as well as a reduction in fibrinogen concentration, platelet adhesiveness and whole blood viscosity. The recommended dose of pentoxifylline is 400 mg three times daily with meals. Cilostazol is a potent, reversible, phosphodiesterase III inhibitor. The inhibition of phosphodiesterase allows for the increased availability of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). cAMP mediates many agonist-induced platelet inhibitory, vasodilatory and vascular antiproliferative responses. Cilostazol, at a dose of 100 mg twice daily, is recommended to be taken 30 minutes before or 2 hours after breakfast and dinner. In addition to pentoxifylline and cilostazol, clinical trials indicate many other drugs may relieve the symptoms of intermittent claudication. Ginkgo biloba, available as an over-the-counter extract, provides symptom relief comparable to pentoxifylline. Two European agents, naftidrofuryl and buflomedil, also have efficacy that is reported to be similar to pentoxifylline. Policosanol is a mixture of fatty alcohols derived from honeybee wax which, according to very limited data, reduces symptoms of claudication. Amino acids, certain peptides and prostaglandins may have a therapeutic role. Finally, novel approaches including angiogenesis mediated by growth factors, are currently under investigation.

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