CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Impact of preventing exacerbations on deterioration of health status in COPD.

Exacerbations of chronic obstuctive pulmonary disease (COPD) are associated with worse health status. The Inhaled Steroids in Obstructive Lung Disease in Europe (ISOLDE) study showed that treatment with fluticasone propionate (FP) reduced exacerbation frequency and the rate of deterioration in health status as compared with placebo. The present study analysed these data to test whether the effect of FP on health status was attributable to its effect on exacerbations. Rates of deterioration in St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total score were obtained for 613 patients with moderate to severe COPD followed for a maximum of 3 yrs. Exacerbation rates were skewed and could not be normalised, therefore, patients were stratified into three exacerbation groups: none, infrequent (<1.65 exacerbations x yr(-1)) and frequent (>1.65 exacerbations x yr(-1)). There were 91 patients with no exacerbations, 285 with infrequent exacerbations and 235 with frequent exacerbations. Frequent exacerbations were independently associated with a worse baseline SGRQ score (p<0.0001) and a more rapid rate of deterioration in health status (p=0.0003). Exacerbation frequency and rate of decline in forced expiratory volume in one second were independently related to the rate of deterioration in SGRQ score. Statistical modelling showed the beneficial effect of fluticasone propionate on deterioration in health status to be largely due to its effect on exacerbation frequency.

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