COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Familial aggregation of Hodgkin lymphoma and related tumors.

Cancer 2004 May 2
BACKGROUND: The importance of genetic factors in the etiology of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has been suggested by family and population studies. However, the spectrum of malignancies associated with common genetic etiology and the effects of gender and age on familial risk have not been established.

METHODS: Diagnoses of lymphoproliferative malignancies were compared in 15,799 first-degree relatives of 5047 patients with HL versus 32,117 first-degree relatives of 10,078 control probands from Sweden and in 7185 first-degree relatives of 2429 patients with HL versus 27,434 first-degree relatives of 8,495 control probands from Denmark using marginal survival models.

RESULTS: The risk of HL in relatives of patients with HL was increased significantly in both populations, with relative risks of 3.47 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.77-6.80) in Sweden and 2.55 (95% CI, 1.01-6.45) in Denmark and a pooled estimate of 3.11 (95%CI, 1.82-5.29). In Sweden, risks for relatives of patients also were increased significantly for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (in males). Relative risks were higher in males compared with females and in siblings of patients compared with parents and offspring of patients. Relatives of patients with earlier-onset disease were at higher risk for HL.

CONCLUSIONS: HL has an important familial component, which is stronger in families of affected individuals age < 40 years, in males, and in siblings, and it is shared with some (but not other) lymphoproliferative malignancies. The cumulative lifetime risks are very small, however, for the development of HL de novo or in first-degree relatives of affected patients.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app