COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Inguinal cord lipomas.

Fatty tissue within the internal cremasteric fascia is frequently encountered during hernia surgery, and it is called a cord lipoma in the surgical literature. Between 1997 and 2001, 128 consecutive patients with 139 indirect inguinal hernias, who underwent open repair, were evaluated. A total of 100 lipomas of the spermatic cord or round ligament were identified and resected in 92 patients. There were no reported neoplastic changes noted in histopathologic examinations of the specimens. The incidence of cord lipoma associated with indirect inguinal hernia was 72.5%. Average body mass index (BMI) was 25.7 in patients with lipoma and 24.6 in patients without lipoma ( P=0.048). The incidence of cord lipoma in large hernias (Nyhus Type II and IIIb) was higher in our patients ( P<0.005). It can be clearly seen during laparoscopic exploration of the preperitoneal space that cord lipoma is a continuation of extraperitoneal fat tissue. We believe that even if there is no peritoneal sac, the herniation of extraperitoneal fat through the inguinal canal should be counted as an inguinal hernia, and it requires treatment.

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