English Abstract
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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[The clinic significance of urinary podocytes in patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis].

OBJECTIVE: To address the significance of urinary podocytes in the diagnosis of human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis(FSGS).

METHODS: Twelve patients with FSGS and 20 patients with minimal change disease (MCD) were diagnosed by routine renal biopsy, and 8 healthy persons as controls. Morning urinary sediments was collected and centrifuged onto glass slides. Urinary podocytes were identified by immunofluorescent staining of podocyte specific protein Podocalyxin(PCX). The state of podocytes in glomeruli was observed using immunofluorescence.

RESULTS: Urinary podocytes were found in 8 out of 12 FSGS patients(66.67%), whereas none of 20 patients with MCD and control had podocytes in their urine. FSGS patients with positives urinary podocytes had prominent manifestation of nephropathy syndrome, whereas no nephrotic syndrome in patients with negative urinary podocytes. Focal absence of the expression of PCX, a marker protein of podocytes in glomeruli was found in FSGS patients, and the locations of absence were consistent with the lesions of focal sclerosis in glomeruli. In contrast, PCX was expressed integrally in MCD patients.

CONCLUSION: Appearances of podocytes in urine of patients with nephropathy may be used as one of the reliable, convenient and unharmful accessorial methods for distinguished diagnosis of FSGS and MCD.

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