CLINICAL TRIAL
COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Efficacy of methylprednisolone and urokinase pulse therapy combined with or without cyclophosphamide in severe Henoch-Schoenlein nephritis: a clinical and histopathological study.

BACKGROUND: There have been few controlled studies of combined therapy with multiple drugs, including immunosuppressives, for severe Henoch-Schoenlein nephritis (HSPN). We evaluated the efficacy of methylprednisolone and urokinase pulse therapy combined with cyclophosphamide for patients with HSPN of at least grade IVb.

METHODS: We studied 37 patients who had been diagnosed with HSPN of at least grade IVb. Of them, 20 (Group A) were treated with methylprednisolone and urokinase pulse therapy, and 17 (Group B) were treated with methylprednisolone and urokinase pulse therapy combined with cyclophophamide. We analysed the clinical features, laboratory and pathological findings of the two groups retrospectively.

RESULTS: After 6 months of treatment, mean urinary protein excretion in Group B had significantly decreased compared with Group A, and the activity index of both groups at the second biopsy was lower than that at the first. Furthermore, at the second biopsy, the chronicity index of Group B was lower than that of Group A. Four patients of Group A but none of Group B had persistent nephropathy (P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that methylprednisolone and urokinase pulse therapy combined with cyclophosphamide is useful for patients with severe HSPN.

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