COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
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Clinical and outcome characteristics of children with adrenocortical tumors: a report from the International Pediatric Adrenocortical Tumor Registry.

PURPOSE: We created a registry for pediatric adrenocortical tumors (ACTs), which are rare and are not well characterized. We provide a descriptive analysis of 254 patients registered on the International Pediatric Adrenocortical Tumor Registry.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between January 1990 and December 2001, 254 patients younger than 20 years of age with newly diagnosed or previously treated ACTs were registered. A histologic diagnosis of ACT was required, although central review was not mandatory. Follow-up information was periodically requested from the referring physician. Treatment was chosen by the primary physician.

RESULTS: The overall female-male ratio was 1.6:1, but it varied widely among age groups. The most common presenting sign (84.2%) was virilization. Cushing's syndrome without virilization was uncommon (5.5%). Tumors were completely resected in 83% of patients. Patients with disseminated or residual disease received mitotane, cisplatin, etoposide, and/or doxorubicin, and rarely, radiation therapy. At a median follow-up of 2 years and 5 months, 157 patients (61.8%) survived without evidence of disease and 97 patients (38.2%) had died. The 5-year event-free survival estimate was 54.2% (95% CI, 48.2% to 60.2%). In a multivariate analysis, disease stage, presenting signs of endocrine dysfunction, and age were independently associated with prognosis.

CONCLUSION: Childhood ACTs occur predominantly in females and almost always causes clinical signs. Complete resection is required for cure. Residual or metastatic disease carries a poor prognosis. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a disease-specific database for obtaining meaningful clinical and outcome information.

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