CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
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The surgical treatment of Dupuytren's contracture: a synthesis of techniques.

Dupuytren's disease is an affliction of the palmar fascia. Selective fasciectomy is recommended once contracture has occurred. Alternatives for wound closure include tissue rearrangement, the open palm technique, and full-thickness skin grafting. In this prospective study, a new "synthesis" technique was used to treat a cohort of patients with advanced Dupuytren's disease. The results were then compared with those of a second cohort of patients who underwent the open palm technique. Thirty consecutive patients were selected. Ten patients (nine men and one woman; average age, 67 years) underwent the open palm technique, and 20 patients (18 men and two women; average age, 70 years) underwent the synthesis method. Follow-up was 3.5 years for the open palm group and 2.7 years for the synthesis group. All patients in both groups improved with respect to motion, function, appearance, and satisfaction. Objectively, for the open palm technique, metacarpophalangeal joint contracture decreased from 50 degrees to 0 degrees, and proximal interphalangeal joint contracture decreased from 40 degrees to 6 degrees. Using the synthesis method, metacarpophalangeal joint contracture decreased from 57 degrees to 0 degrees, and proximal interphalangeal joint contracture decreased from 58 degrees to 10 degrees. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Test scores decreased from 37 to 30 in both groups. There were no significant differences between groups in these parameters. The two significant intergroup differences were healing time (40 days for the open palm technique versus 28 days for the synthesis method) and recurrence rate (50 percent for open palm versus 0 percent for synthesis). The synthesis technique combines with success the best features of current methods for the surgical treatment of advanced Dupuytren's disease.

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