JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Adenotonsillectomy improves neurocognitive function in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

Sleep 2003 December 16
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate neurocognitive functions of children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), before and after adenotonsillectomy, compared with healthy controls.

DESIGN: Prospective study.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-nine children with OSAS aged 5 to 9 years (mean age, 6.8 +/- 0.2 years) and 20 healthy children (mean age, 7.4 +/- 1.4 years) who served as controls, underwent a battery of neurocognitive tests containing process-oriented intelligence scales. Twenty-seven children in the OSAS group underwent follow-up neurocognitive testing 6 to 10 months after adenotonsillectomy. Fourteen children in the control group were also reevaluated 6 to 10 months after the first evaluation.

RESULTS: Children with OSAS had lower scores compared with healthy children in some Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC) subtests and in the general scale Mental Processing Composite, indicating impaired neurocognitive function. No correlation was found between neurocognitive performance and OSAS severity. Six to 10 months after adenotonsillectomy, the children with OSAS demonstrated significant improvement in sleep characteristics, as well as in daytime behavior. Their neurocognitive performance improved considerably, reaching the level of the control group in the subtests Gestalt Closure, Triangles, Word Order, and the Matrix analogies, as well as in the K-ABC general scales, Sequential and Simultaneous Processing scales, and the Mental Processing Composite scale. The magnitude of the change expressed as effect sizes showed medium and large improvements in all 3 general scales of the K-ABC tests.

CONCLUSIONS: Neurocognitive function is impaired in otherwise healthy children with OSAS. Most functions improve to the level of the control group, indicating that the impaired neurocognitive functions are mostly reversible, at least 3 to 10 months following adenotonsillectomy.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app