CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
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Effects of cilostazol in patients with Raynaud's syndrome.

Raynaud's syndrome (RS), which is characterized by recurrent episodes of vasospasm with exposure to cold, may occur alone (primary RS) or in association with connective tissue diseases or other underlying conditions (secondary RS). We investigated the effect of cilostazol on vessel wall responses in RS. Patients were diagnosed (primary or secondary RS associated with connective tissue diseases) and randomized to placebo or cilostazol 100 mg twice daily for 6 weeks in a double-blind manner. Brachial artery vasoreactivity, laser Doppler fluxmetry, and cold pressor testing (CPT) were performed at study initiation and completion. Symptoms were assessed using standardized questionnaires. Forty subjects completed the study (19 with primary RS and 21 with secondary RS). Cilostazol significantly increased the mean brachial artery diameter at 6 weeks (primary RS, p = 0.006; secondary RS, p = 0.06). There was no change in median flow-mediated dilation (FMD) with cilostazol in primary RS (25th, 75th percentiles) (4.06% [2.5, 6.1] to -0.77% [-2.4, 3.4] or secondary RS (2.2% [0.05, 6.3] to 2.95% [1.7, 7.4]). There were no changes in nitroglycerin-mediated dilation or microvascular flow indexes in either cohort. In patients with primary RS, cilostazol treatment yielded a positive change in the slope of brachial responsiveness to CPT (increase of 0.32 mm/min; p = 0.002 vs placebo). Cilostazol treatment remained significantly associated with increased brachial artery diameter when controlling for baseline values (p = 0.018). Cilostazol increased conduit vessel diameter in patients with primary and secondary RS, with a favorable impact on conduit vessel responsiveness to cold in patients with primary RS without affecting microvascular flow or symptoms.

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