COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY

Patient-reported utilization patterns of fentanyl transdermal system and oxycodone hydrochloride controlled-release among patients with chronic nonmalignant pain

Stacey J Ackerman, Margaret Mordin, Joseph Reblando, Xiao Xu, Jeff Schein, Sue Vallow, Michael Brennan
Journal of Managed Care Pharmacy: JMCP 2003, 9 (3): 223-31
14613465

BACKGROUND: Although use of long-acting opioid analgesics has increased for chronic nonmalignant pain management, little is known about patient-reported utilization patterns.

OBJECTIVE: To assess patient-reported utilization patterns of fentanyl transdermal system and oxycodone hydrochloride (HCl) controlled-release among patients with chronic nonmalignant pain and to compare these patterns to standard dose administration guidelines recommended in the manufacturers. prescribing information (PI).

METHODS: Cross-sectional, observational, multicenter study of English-speaking patients who were seeking chronic nonmalignant pain management from 6 outpatient pain clinics. The inclusion criteria for the study were (1) diagnosis of chronic nonmalignant pain, (2) prescription for and current use of either transdermal fentanyl or oxycodone HCl controlled-release, and (3) duration of use for either transdermal fentanyl or oxycodone HCl controlled-release of at least 6 weeks. Patients completed either an oxycodone HCl controlled-release or transdermal fentanyl utilization questionnaire. A conversion table was used to standardize opioid analgesic doses from transdermal fentanyl or oxycodone HCl controlled-release to daily oral morphine equivalents. The principal outcome measures were the average interval between oxycodone HCl controlled-release administrations, the number of days the current transdermal fentanyl patch would be worn, and the percentage of oxycodone HCl controlled-release and transdermal fentanyl patients whose administration frequency exceeded the standard recommendation in the manufacturer.s PI (every 12 hours for oxycodone HCl controlled-release or every 72 hours for transdermal fentanyl). Other outcome measures included the number of oxycodone HCl controlled-release tablets per administration, the daily dose of long-acting opioid, the duration of adequate pain relief, and the difference in daily oral morphine equivalents between transdermal fentanyl and oxycodone HCl controlled-release patients, after adjusting in a multivariate regression model for demographic and clinical characteristics.

RESULTS: A total of 690 patients were enrolled in this study; 437 (63.4%) received oxycodone HCl controlled-release and 253 (36.6%) received transdermal fentanyl. Oxycodone HCl controlled-release patients reported taking a median of 1 tablet 3 times per day or a median of 3 tablets per day. A mean of 1.6 tablets per administration and 4.6 tablets per day were taken. The average interval between administrations of oxycodone HCl controlled-release was 7.8 hours, and the median daily dose was 80.0 mg (mean 155.6 mg). Among oxycodone HCl controlled-release patients, 17.5% had an average interval between administrations of 12 or more hours, whereas 1.9% reported the duration of pain relief as 12 or more hours. Transdermal fentanyl patients reported wearing the patch, on average, for 2.5 days (median 2.5),and 41.2% reported wearing the patch for at least 3 days, whereas 14.1% reported the duration of pain relief as at least 3 days. The median daily dosage strength of transdermal fentanyl was 75.0 mcg/hour. In the multivariate regression analysis, oxycodone HCl controlled-release patients had, on average, roughly 22 mg additional oral morphine equivalents per day relative to transdermal fentanyl patients (not statistically significant); the probability that oxycodone HCl controlled-release patients had higher oral morphine equivalents was 82.6%, which suggests a trend toward higher oral morphine equivalents per day in the oxycodone HCl controlled-release group.

CONCLUSION: Transdermal fentanyl and oxycodone HCl controlled-release both appear to be used by patients in a manner that is inconsistent with the standard recommendation in the manufacturers' PI;however, the difference between patient-reported utilization and the PI recommendation is more pronounced with oxycodone HCl controlled-release.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
14613465
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"