JOURNAL ARTICLE

[Influence of intra-abdominal hypertension on the intestinal permeability and endotoxin/bacteria translocation in rabbits]

Jun-tao Cheng, Guang-xia Xiao, Pei-yuan Xia, Jian-cheng Yuan, Xiao-jian Qin
Zhonghua Shao Shang za Zhi, Zhonghua Shaoshang Zazhi, Chinese Journal of Burns 2003, 19 (4): 229-32
14514405

OBJECTIVE: To observe different degrees of intra-abdominal pressure and different duration on the intestinal permeability and endotoxin/bacteria translocation in rabbit model, so as to explore the mechanism of the development of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) and MODS.

METHODS: Rabbit model of intra-abdominal hypertension was established by injection of gaseous nitrogen into the peritoneal cavity. Thirty-nine New Zealand white rabbits were employed in the study. The change in intestinal permeability was determined by fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-D) and two kinds of molecular probes of type II horseradish peroxidase (HRP-II). The effects of intra-abdominal hypertension on the endotoxin/bacteria translocation were also detected.

RESULTS: The contents of FITC-D and HRP-II in portal veins increased evidently (P < 0.01) when intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) was higher than 20 mmHg. The endotoxin (ET) content in portal vein in rabbits with IAP of 10 mmHg for 1, 2 and 4 hours exhibited no difference compared with that in normal control, while the ET content increased obviously after 1 hour with IAP of 20 mmHg and increased thereafter along with the prolongation of IAP, and increase in pressure. The bacterial translocation rates were 33.3%, 66.7% and 100% when IAP was maintained at 20 mmHg for 1, 2 and 4 hours, respectively, and there was evidence of bacterial translocation to the liver. The rate of bacterial translocation to intestinal mesenteric lymph nodes was 100% when IAP was 30 mmHg for 1 and 2 hours. There was no bacterial translocation to the spleen in all experimental rabbits.

CONCLUSION: Intestinal mucosal permeability increased significantly with increased endotoxin content in portal vein when IAP was higher than 20 mmHg. At the sane time, the bacteria could be translocate to intestinal mesenteric lymph nodes and liver, which might be constitute one of the important factors leading to the development of ACS and MODS.

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