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Iliotibial band friction syndrome: MR imaging findings.

Radiology 1992 November
Six patients with clinical histories and physical examination results consistent with iliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS) were examined with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Ill-defined decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted images and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images was present deep to the iliotibial band, adjacent to the lateral femoral epicondyle. Axial fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) gradient-echo sequences were essential in differentiating the ill-defined signal intensity abnormality associated with ITBFS from fluid in the lateral knee joint. None of these patients were found to have lateral meniscal tears, and all responded to conservative measures directed at treating ITBFS. The authors conclude that MR imaging may be useful in confirming or establishing the diagnosis of ITBFS in patients with the appropriate clinical history and distal lateral thigh or lateral knee pain.

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