JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
REVIEW
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Stroke epidemiology: a review of population-based studies of incidence, prevalence, and case-fatality in the late 20th century.

Lancet Neurology 2003 January
This overview of population-based studies of incidence, prevalence, mortality, and case-fatality of stroke was based on studies from 1990. Incidence (first stroke in an individual's lifetime) and prevalence were computed by age, sex, and stroke type. Age-standardised incidence and prevalence with the corresponding 95% CI were plotted for each study to facilitate comparisons. The review shows that the burden of stroke is high and is likely to increase in future decades as a result of demographic and epidemiological transitions in populations. The main features of stroke epidemiology include modest geographical variation in incidence, prevalence, and case-fatality among the--predominantly white--populations studied so far, and a stabilisation or reversal in the declining secular trends in the pre-1990s rates, especially in older people. However, further research that uses the best possible methods to study the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of stroke are urgently needed in other populations of the world, especially in less developed countries where the risk of stroke is high, lifestyles are changing rapidly, and population restructuring is occurring.

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