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Dermatological and ophthalmological sequels in toxic epidermal necrolysis.

BACKGROUND: Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare, drug-induced disease characterized by epidermal detachment and mucosal involvement. After an acute period, potentially disabling cutaneous and ocular sequels may appear. Although long-term complications are not rare, only few outcome studies are published.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the incidence of dermatological and ophthalmological sequels following TEN, to describe its clinical aspects and correlation with acute involvement.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eight patients surviving to TEN were submitted to dermatological and ophthalmological observation ranging from 0.5 to 8 years after hospitalization. Cutaneous and ocular involvement, during the acute phase, was retrospectively analysed.

RESULTS: Dermatological sequels were observed in 6 patients (75%) corresponding to those with more extensive skin involvement in the acute phase. The most frequent complications were cutaneous dyschromia (62.5%) and nail dystrophies (37.5%). Six patients (75%) had ocular complications with tarsal conjunctiva keratinization in 5 (62.5%) and keratoconjunctivitis sicca in 4 of them (50%). Trichiasis, corneal neovascularization and symblepharon were observed in 1 case. There was no correlation between the severity of acute ocular involvement and long-term complications.

CONCLUSION: Following TEN, most patients have dermatological and ophthalmological sequels that persist for several years.

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