EVALUATION STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Transdermal electromotive administration of verapamil and dexamethasone for Peyronie's disease.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of the transdermal electromotive administration of verapamil and dexamethasone on plaque size, penile deviation, pain, erectile function and capacity for vaginal penetration in patients with Peyronie's disease.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty-nine patients were treated four times weekly for six consecutive weeks. During each session the drug mixture was administered from a receptacle fixed to the skin overlying the plaques, using 2.4 mA pulsed current for 20 min. Plaque size and penile deviation were evaluated by dynamic penile duplex ultrasonography, X-ray and photographs; pain, erectile function and capacity for vaginal penetration were assessed using a questionnaire. Vital signs and side-effects were recorded. Differences before and after treatment were assessed.

RESULTS: The plaque disappeared in 8% of patients, with a measurable reduction in volume in 74% and no change in 18% (P < 0.001). Penile deviation resolved in 10% of the men, decreased in 74% and remained unchanged in 16% (P < 0.001). The plaque volume was halved in two-thirds of the men, to a mean (sd) of 515 (301) mm3, and the penile deviation halved in 45% of patients, to 24 (5) degrees; pain was completely eliminated in 88% (P < 0.001). Erectile function was completely restored in 42% of patients with initial erectile dysfunction and improved in 17% (P < 0.001); vaginal penetration improved in 73%. No toxicity was noted, except for a transient skin erythema at the site of the penile and dispersive electrodes.

CONCLUSION: The transdermal electromotive administration of verapamil and dexamethasone is clinically safe and appears to be an effective treatment in patients with Peyronie's disease.

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