JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

A home-based pedometer-driven walking program to increase physical activity in older adults with osteoarthritis of the knee: a preliminary study

Laura A Talbot, Jean M Gaines, Tu N Huynh, E Jeffrey Metter
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 2003, 51 (3): 387-92
12588583

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a home-based pedometer-driven walking program with arthritis self-management education (Walk +) would increase physical activity, muscle strength, and functional performance in older adults with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee as opposed to arthritis self-management education alone (EDU).

DESIGN: A randomized two-by-three (group-by-time) design with participants assigned to Walk + (n = 17, mean age +/- standard deviation = 69.6 +/- 6.7) or EDU (n = 17, age = 70.8 +/- 4.7).

SETTING: Community located in the Baltimore-Washington area.

PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-four community-dwelling adults, aged 60 and older with symptomatic knee OA and self-reported functional impairment.

INTERVENTIONS: Both groups received 12 hours of the Arthritis Self-Management program over 12 weeks and were followed for an additional 12 weeks. In addition, the Walk + group received individualized instruction in the use of a pedometer, with the goal of increasing their step count by 30% of their baseline step count.

MEASUREMENTS: The outcome measures were physical activity (daily step counts and total activity vector magnitude as measured by a pedometer and Tritrac-R3D accelerometer), quadriceps femoris strength (isometric peak torque), and functional performance tasks (100-foot walk-turn-walk, timed stair climb, timed chair rise, and pain status).

RESULTS: Daily steps walked showed a significant group-by-time interaction (P =.04) after controlling for age. From baseline to completion of training, a 23% increase in daily steps occurred in the Walk + group and a 15% decrease in the EDU group. Although steps increased in the Walk + group, total activity vector magnitude was maintained, suggesting a more efficient gait. The Walk + group became quicker than the EDU group in the normal-pace walk-turn-walk (P =.04). An isometric strength gain of 21% postintervention was seen in the Walk + group, compared with a loss of 3.5% in the EDU group.

CONCLUSION: In older adults with symptomatic knee OA, Walk + appears to increase walking, with improvements in muscle strength and walking performance. The use of a home-based pedometer-driven program to increase physical activity, strength, and function in this population warrants further research.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
12588583
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"