Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Chemical gastropathy: a distinct histopathologic entity in children.

BACKGROUND: Chemical gastropathy, also known as chemical or reactive gastritis, is a well-described histopathologic entity in adults. It is characterized by presence of foveolar hyperplasia, vascular congestion, lamina propria edema, and prominent smooth muscle fibers in the absence of inflammatory cells in the gastric antral mucosa. There are no data in children on this condition.

METHODS: All children showing features of chemical gastropathy in antral biopsy specimens were identified from pathology database from 1997 to 2000. Antral biopsy specimens were reviewed to assess the diagnosis of chemical gastropathy using standard diagnostic criteria. Charts of the children diagnosed with chemical gastropathy were reviewed for clinical course, endoscopic findings, and risk factors.

RESULTS: Twenty-one children (12 male, 9 female) with chemical gastropathy were identified. Common presenting symptoms were epigastric pain and vomiting. Eleven children were taking multiple medications, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Endoscopy revealed esophagitis in 12, antral erythema in 7, and thick bile in the stomach in 7 children. Antral histology revealed foveolar hyperplasia in 19, congestion in 20, lamina propria edema and smooth muscle fibers in 16, and absence of inflammation in 19 patients. Acid suppression was the treatment in all patients. Mean follow-up duration was 11 months in 17 children. Symptoms resolved completely in 11 and partially in 6 patients.

CONCLUSIONS: As in adults, chemical gastropathy occurs in children. The factors associated with chemical gastropathy in this survey were gastroesophageal reflux disease and intake of multiple medications, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app