JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Foregut duplications.

Twenty-one children were treated for foregut duplications at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children over a 42-year period. There were 11 males and 10 females. The mean age at diagnosis was 1 year 6 months; antenatal diagnosis was made in 1 case. Respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI) presentation predominated. The diagnosis was made by chest radiograph (10), barium swallow (5), at operation (4), and by ultrasound (2). All patients were treated surgically; the mortality was 10%. The histology of the epithelial lining of the duplications revealed gastric mucosa in 15 cases; in 5 the duplication cyst was lined by more than one cell type. Nine patients had other associated congenital anomalies, the majority of these were vertebral abnormalities. The size of this series emphasises that clinicians should be aware that duplication cysts occur and should be considered in a child with unusual respiratory or GI symptoms.

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