COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

Propofol-ketamine versus propofol-fentanyl for outpatient laparoscopy: comparison of postoperative nausea, emesis, analgesia, and recovery

Manuel C Vallejo, Ryan C Romeo, Derek J Davis, Sivam Ramanathan
Journal of Clinical Anesthesia 2002, 14 (6): 426-31
12393110

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To compare postoperative nausea, emesis, analgesia, and recovery between propofol-ketamine and propofol-fentanyl in outpatient laparoscopic tubal ligations with general anesthesia.

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, blinded study.

SETTING: Tertiary-care women's hospital.

PATIENTS: 120 ASA physical status I and II ambulatory patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic tubal ligation.

INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomized to two groups to receive either ketamine (1-1.5 mg/kg) or fentanyl (3-5 microg/kg).

MEASUREMENTS: Measured variables included total dose of ketamine, fentanyl, propofol, and operating time. Vital signs, pain visual analog scale scores (VAS), nausea VAS, presence of emesis, treatment for nausea and vomiting, pruritus, sedation, and presence of dreaming were recorded on postanesthesia care unit (PACU) admission, PACU discharge, stepdown unit admission, and hospital discharge. Results are expressed as means +/- SD or medians and analyzed using t-test, Chi-square, or Mann-Whitney (p < 0.05).

MAIN RESULTS: No differences were noted with respect to propofol dose, operating times, pain or nausea VAS scores, emesis, treatment for nausea and vomiting, pruritus, and sedation on PACU admission, PACU discharge, stepdown unit admission, and hospital discharge. The ketamine group had a higher heart rate, required more pain medication, and had a higher frequency of dreaming on PACU admission than the fentanyl group. These differences became insignificant on PACU discharge.

CONCLUSIONS: For outpatient laparoscopic tubal ligations with general anesthesia, propofol-ketamine does not improve postoperative nausea, emesis, analgesia or recovery compared with the propofol-fentanyl combination.

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