JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Nephrolithiasis and osteoporosis associated with hypophosphatemia caused by mutations in the type 2a sodium-phosphate cotransporter.

BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies suggest that genetic factors confer a predisposition to the formation of renal calcium stones or bone demineralization. Low serum phosphate concentrations due to a decrease in renal phosphate reabsorption have been reported in some patients with these conditions, suggesting that genetic factors leading to a decrease in renal phosphate reabsorption may contribute to them. We hypothesized that mutations in the gene coding for the main renal sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NPT2a) may be present in patients with these disorders.

METHODS: We studied 20 patients with urolithiasis or bone demineralization and persistent idiopathic hypophosphatemia associated with a decrease in maximal renal phosphate reabsorption. The coding region of the gene for NPT2a was sequenced in all patients. The functional consequences of the mutations identified were analyzed by expressing the mutated RNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

RESULTS: Two patients, one with recurrent urolithiasis and one with bone demineralization, were heterozygous for two distinct mutations. One mutation resulted in the substitution of phenylalanine for alanine at position 48, and the other in a substitution of methionine for valine at position 147. Phosphate-induced current and sodium-dependent phosphate uptake were impaired in oocytes expressing the mutant NPT2a. Coinjection of oocytes with wild-type and mutant RNA indicated that the mutant protein had altered function.

CONCLUSIONS: Heterozygous mutations in the NPT2a gene may be responsible for hypophosphatemia and urinary phosphate loss in persons with urolithiasis or bone demineralization.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app