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Tc-99m-ECD SPECT brain imaging in children with Tourette's syndrome.

We undertook this study to assess the patterns of regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) with SPECT using Technetium- 99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer (Tc-99m-ECD) in children with Tourette's Syndrome (TS), and to compare these with the patterns in a group of normal controls. The study sample consisted of 38 children (7 to 14 years) who met the ICD-10 and DSM/IV criteria for Tourette's Syndrome, and a control group of 18 children (9 to 14 years). The Children's Depression Inventory and Maudsley Obsessional-Compulsive Questionnaire were used for assessment, and the severity of motor and vocal tics were assessed using the Goetz Rating Scale. The RCP values were significantly lower in the TS group in left caudate, cingulum, right cerebellum, left dorsolateral prefrontal, and the left orbital frontal region. A positive correlation was found between the severity of vocal tics and blood flow of mid-cerebellum, right dorsolateral prefrontal and left dorsolateral prefrontal regions. Although no depressive or obsessive patients were included in the study, the depression and obsession scores were found to be negatively correlated with all RCP values, especially in the temporal regions. Further studies are needed to explore the relationship between the hypoperfusion of certain brain areas and the underlying neurophysiology and neurobiology of patients with TS. Additional disturbances such as obsessive-compulsive symptoms and depressive symptoms should also be assessed

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