CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Post-streptococcal autoimmune neuropsychiatric disease presenting as paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis.

Paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis (PDC) is an episodic, non-kinesogenic, extrapyramidal movement disorder. It is postulated that PDC is an ion channel disorder. We describe a sporadic case of paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis occurring after streptococcal pharyngitis. The episodes were characterized by abrupt-onset dystonic posturing, choreoathetosis, visual hallucinations and behavioral disturbance. Each episode lasted between 10 minutes and 4 hours, and occurred up to 4 times per day. In between attacks, examination was normal. The episodes waxed and waned in frequency during a 6-month illness. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was normal. Post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disease has a proposed autoimmune etiology, which is supported by the presence of serum antibasal ganglia antibodies. Western immunoblotting of this case's serum demonstrated antibody binding to a basal ganglia antigens of molecular weight 80 kDa and 95 kDa. Immunohistochemistry examination demonstrated specific antibody binding to large striatal neurones. We propose that autoantibodies produced in post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disease cause alteration in neurotransmission, possibly secondary to ion channel binding.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app