COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Smoking and lung function of Lung Health Study participants after 11 years.

Eleven years after Lung Health Study (LHS) entry, we performed spirometry in 77.4% of surviving participants who enrolled in a long-term follow-up study. Those not enrolling tended to be younger male heavy smokers who continued to smoke during the LHS. Their initial LHS lung function, after adjustment for these factors, did not differ from that of enrollees. Smoking habits by original LHS treatment groups (smoking intervention vs. usual care) tended to converge, but 93% of participants who were abstinent throughout the LHS were still abstinent at 11 years. Differences in lung function between treatment groups persisted; smoking intervention participants had less decline in FEV(1) than usual care participants. Men who quit at the beginning of the LHS had an FEV(1) rate of decline of 30.2 ml/year, whereas women who quit declined at 21.5 ml/year. Men continuing to smoke throughout the 11 years declined by 66.1 ml/year, and women continuing to smoke declined by 54.2 ml/year. When decline in FEV(1) was expressed as a percentage of predicted normal value, no significant sex-based difference was apparent among continuing smokers. At 11 years, 38% of continuing smokers had an FEV(1) less than 60% of the predicted normal value compared with 10% of sustained quitters.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app