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Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Late-onset myoclonic epilepsy in Down's syndrome (LOMEDS).

The aim of this paper is to report a patient with late-onset myoclonic epilepsy in Down's syndrome (LOMEDS) as a differential diagnosis of adult-onset progressive myoclonic epilepsies. A 55-year-old male with Down's syndrome (DS) is described who developed progressively frequent myoclonus and generalized myoclonic-tonic seizures (GMTSs) at the age of 52. EEG recordings demonstrated background slowing and generalized polyspike-wave discharges occasionally associated with myoclonic jerks, leading to the classification of the primary generalized epileptic myoclonus. Descriptions of late-onset epilepsy in DS patients are rare. However, a review of the pertinent literature revealed at least two other cases of elderly DS patients developing progressive myoclonic epilepsy after the onset of dementia. We suggest that late-onset myoclonic epilepsy in Down's syndrome as characterized here should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adult-onset myoclonic epilepsies. LOMEDS apparently shares features with myoclonic epilepsy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Unverricht-Lundborg disease (ULD) caused by a mutation on chromosome 21. Since life expectation of DS patients has markedly increased, LOMEDS may be more frequent than currently acknowledged.

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