COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Osteogenesis imperfecta type VII: an autosomal recessive form of brittle bone disease.

Bone 2002 July
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disease of bone with low bone mass and bone fragility. The disease is generally classified into four types based on clinical features and disease severity, although recently fifth and sixth forms have also been reported. Most forms of OI are autosomal dominant. Rarely, autosomal recessive disease has been described. We report the clinical, radiological, and histological features of four children (age 3.9-8.6 years at last follow-up; all girls) and four adults (age 28-33 years; two women) with a novel form of autosomal recessive OI living in an isolated First Nations community in northern Quebec. In keeping with the established numeric classification for OI forms, we have called this form of the disease OI type VII. The phenotype is moderate to severe, characterized by fractures at birth, bluish sclerae, early deformity of the lower extremities, coxa vara, and osteopenia. Rhizomelia is a prominent clinical feature. Histomorphometric analyses of iliac crest bone samples revealed findings similar to OI type I, with decreased cortical width and trabecular number, increased bone turnover, and preservation of the birefringent pattern of lamellar bone. The disease has subsequently been localized to chromosome 3p22-24.1, which is outside the loci for type I collagen genes. The underlying genetic basis for the disease remains to be determined.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app