Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Renal myogenic response: kinetic attributes and physiological role.

The kinetic attributes of the afferent arteriole myogenic response were investigated using the in vitro perfused hydronephrotic rat kidney. Equations describing the time course for pressure-dependent vasoconstriction and vasodilation, and steady-state changes in diameter were combined to develop a mathematical model of autoregulation. Transfer functions were constructed by passing sinusoidal pressure waves through the model. These findings were compared with results derived using data from instrumented conscious rats. In each case, a reduction in gain and increase in phase were observed at frequencies of 0.2 to 0.3 Hz. We then examined the impact of oscillating pressure signals. The model predicted that pressure signals oscillating at frequencies above the myogenic operating range would elicit a sustained vasoconstriction the magnitude of which was dependent on peak pressure. These predictions were directly confirmed in the hydronephrotic kidney. Pressure oscillations presented at frequencies of 1 to 6 Hz elicited sustained afferent vasoconstrictions and the magnitude of the response depended exclusively on the peak pressure. Elevated systolic pressure elicited vasoconstriction even if mean pressure was reduced. These findings challenge the view that the renal myogenic response exists to maintain glomerular capillary pressure constant, but rather imply a primary role in protecting against elevated systolic pressures. Thus, the kinetic features of the afferent arteriole allow this vessel to adjust tone in response to changes in systolic pressures presented at the pulse rate. We suggest that the primary function of this mechanism is to protect the glomerulus from the blood pressure power that is normally present at the pulse frequency.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app