JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Genome-wide linkage analysis of the acute coronary syndrome suggests a locus on chromosome 2.

A positive family history is a recognized cardiovascular risk factor, and genome-wide scans may reveal susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease. The acute coronary syndrome, consisting of myocardial infarction and unstable angina, is the most important manifestation of coronary disease and is characterized by atherosclerotic plaque disruption and coronary thrombosis. From approximately 6000 hospital admissions to cardiology units, we identified affected sibling pairs (n=61) who had documented acute coronary syndrome before the age of 70 years. A 10-cM resolution genetic map and MAPMAKER/SIBS were used for genome-wide linkage analysis. One locus on chromosome 2q36-q37.3 showed linkage with a lod score of 2.63 (P<0.0001). Separate multipoint fine-mapping of this locus with independent markers replicated the linkage results (lod 2.64). Two other regions on chromosomes 3q26-q27 and 20q11-q13 showed lod scores in excess of 1.5 (P<0.005). This genome scan in acute coronary syndrome suggests 1 locus that encompasses the gene encoding the insulin receptor substrate-1 gene. Two other potential loci were identified. These data imply that a limited number of potent susceptibility genes exist for the acute coronary syndrome. Such genes are likely to be relevant to the combined processes of atherosclerosis, plaque instability, and coronary thrombosis.

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