Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
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A prospective randomized study of the effect of a subcutaneously "buried" peritoneal dialysis catheter technique versus standard technique on the incidence of peritonitis and exit-site infection.

OBJECTIVE: A new method for implantation of peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters was described in 1991. The distal part of the catheter is buried subcutaneously and exteriorized at the start of PD. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of such a subcutaneous rest period on the incidence of peritonitis and exit-site infections (ESI).

DESIGN: Sixty patients were randomized to either the new method (B group; n = 30) or to not having the distal part buried subcutaneously (NB group; n = 30). Sixty-five patients (NS group) were not randomized as they had to start PD within 1-2 weeks after implantation. The Moncrief-Popovich catheter was used in the B and NB groups and a standard Tenckhoff catheter was used in the NS group.

PATIENTS: Patients scheduled for PD treatment, judged not in need of PD for at least 6 weeks after implantation.

RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference in the cumulative probability of not developing peritonitis during the first 6, 12, and 24 months. The incidence of the first episode of peritonitis was 1/40, 1/26, and 1/33 treatment-months in the B, NB, and NS groups, respectively. The incidence of ESI was 1/103 and 1/95 treatment-months in the B and NS groups, respectively. The cumulative probability of not developing ESI was similar in both groups. There were no episodes of ESI in the NB group. The difference in the number of ESI between the NB and NS groups was significant (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Subcutaneous burying of the distal catheter segment prior to starting PD does not reduce the risk of contracting peritonitis or exit-site infection.

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