Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Changing obstetric practices associated with decreasing incidence of meconium aspiration syndrome.

OBJECTIVE: To describe changes in neonatal and obstetric practices that may have contributed to the decreasing incidence of meconium aspiration syndrome in our population during this time.

METHODS: We compared neonatal and obstetric characteristics of 61 infants diagnosed with meconium aspiration syndrome with 1365 infants born through moderate or thick meconium-stained amniotic fluid at more than 37 weeks' completed gestation. Data were prospectively collected, and all respiratory diagnoses were concurrently made. Three distinct birth year groups were analyzed based on changing obstetric practice paradigms.

RESULTS: Meconium aspiration syndrome decreased nearly four-fold from 1990-1992 to 1997-1998 (5.8% to 1.5% of meconium-stained infants more than 37 weeks; P <.003). The only change in neonatal characteristics was a 33% decrease in births more than 41 weeks with a reciprocal 33% increase in births 38-39 weeks during 1997-1998. Significant changes in obstetric practice included more frequent diagnosis of nonreassuring fetal heart rate patterns, greater use of amnioinfusion, and increased cesarean delivery rate in 1997-1998. By logistic regression analysis, the only consistent risk factor for meconium aspiration syndrome across all three epochs was the presence of tracheal meconium.

CONCLUSION: Reduction in post-term delivery was the most important factor in reducing meconium aspiration syndrome.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app