COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Adult height in advanced puberty with or without gonadotropin hormone releasing hormone analog treatment

A C Couto-Silva, L Adan, C Trivin, R Brauner
Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism: JPEM 2002, 15 (3): 297-305
11924932
Advanced puberty is defined as the onset of puberty in girls at 8-10 years of age and in boys at 9-11 years. This study analyzes adult height in 57 children with advanced puberty to evaluate the results of treating children (9 girls and 8 boys) with gonadotropin hormone releasing hormone (GnRH) analog and the impact of advanced puberty on adult height in untreated children (31 girls and 9 boys). For treated girls, adult height predicted at the onset of treatment (151.9+/-1.7 cm) was similar to the final adult height (155.3+/-1.4 cm), but lower than target height (157.2+/-1.6 cm, p = 0.04). For untreated girls, adult height predicted at the initial evaluation (156.7+/-1 cm) was also similar to adult height (157+/-1 cm), but lower than the target height (157.6+/-1 cm, p = 0.03). The adult heights of both treated and untreated girls were similar to their target heights. For treated boys, adult height predicted at the onset of treatment (173.2+/-3.1 cm) was greater than the final adult height (164.1+/-2.1 cm, p = 0.01), which was lower than target height (170.4+/-1.2 cm, p = 0.01). For untreated boys, adult height predicted at the initial evaluation (170.8+/-2.7 cm) was similar to both the adult height (169.1+/-1.9 cm) and target height (170.2+/-1.2 cm). Height gains between the onset of puberty and adult height were similar in treated (29.9+/-2.3 cm in girls and 29.8+/-1.7 cm in boys) and untreated (28.6+/-1 and 33.1+/-2 cm) children. When expressed as SD, the adult height was significantly shorter than that at 4 years in treated girls (difference 1 SD, p = 0.03), in untreated girls (difference 0.9 SD, p = 0.0002) and in treated boys (difference 0.9 SD, p = 0.02), but it was similar to that in untreated boys. Adult height was below target height by >5 cm in seven girls (two of them treated) and five boys (four of them treated). In conclusion, treating advanced puberty did not change the adult height reached by girls, and was associated with reduced growth potential in boys. The adult heights of untreated children were similar to those predicted at the initial evaluation and to target heights, but in girls they were 1 SD lower than the height at 4 years. These data suggest that advanced puberty decreases the growth potential by about 5 cm, and that GnRH analog treatment does not prevent this.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Trending Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
11924932
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"