OPEN IN READ APP
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Quetiapine augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitors in obsessive-compulsive disorder

N Mohr, B Vythilingum, R A Emsley, D J Stein
International Clinical Psychopharmacology 2002, 17 (1): 37-40
11800505
The augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) with atypical antipsychotics for the management of treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is gaining increasing acceptance. Quetiapine is a novel antipsychotic which is well tolerated, and which may therefore be particularly useful in this context. Charts of all patients treated in our OCD clinic with the combination of an SRI and quetiapine were reviewed. Demographic details and clinical symptoms on the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale and the Clinical Global Impressions Scale (CGI) were tabulated before and after augmentation. Eight OCD patients who had proven resistance to treatment with SRIs had received quetiapine augmentation. Four of these eight patients were responders (CGI of 1 or 2) within 4 weeks. In the treatment-responders, the medication was well tolerated. Although limited by the retrospective design and lack of controls, these data are consistent with the growing literature suggesting that approximately one-half of OCD patients resistant to treatment with SRIs may respond to augmentation with an atypical antipsychotic. Quetiapine, a relatively well tolerated agent, deserves further controlled study in this context.

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Trending Papers

Available on the App Store

Available on the Play Store
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
11800505
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"